Tag Archives: death

Gimokodan

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Gimokodan


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Purchase options:

6×6 Digital “Mini Print”: $20

8×8 Digital print (100 in a series):  $50 
12×12 Giclee Print (50 in a series):  $200

Original: $700 

For more information about the types of printing please go here.

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Gimokodan is the underworld in the lore of the Philippine Islands. At the entrance to Gimokodan is the Black River in which souls bathe to eradicate sadness of human life. There is a goddess there with many breasts nurtures and takes care of the spirits of those who died young until they can be reunited with their parents.

I do this piece for several of my friends who have had to let go of their children too soon.  So much love to Bram, Noah, and Isa.

A Mother’s Love

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For Bram cropped
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Purchase options:

8 x 9.5 Digital 12 color print (100 in a series): $25
12 x 14.5 Giclee 24 color Print (50 in a series): $150

Original: SOLD

For more information about the types of printing please go here.

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I did this portrait for a friend of mine whose son, Bram, was killed by a car when he was only 2.5 years old.  I took this photo of him and his mother during the birth of their last baby, in fact I took quite a lot of him while his mama was laboring.  He and his family hold a special place in my heart.

100% of the proceeds will go to the Venn family to help them pay bills and take care of themselves while they deal with so much grief.

“Cycle”

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(Click image to enlarge)

Purchase options:

6×6 Digital “Mini Print”: $20

8×8 Digital print (100 in a series): $40
12×12 Giclee Print (50 in a series): $100

Original: $180

For more information about the types of printing please go here.

For original pieces, payment plans/layaway is available.

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Womb

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(Click image to enlarge)

Purchase options:

6×6 Digital “Mini Print”: $20

8×8 Digital print (100 in a series):  $40
12×12 Giclee Print (50 in a series):  $100

Original:  $180

For more information about the types of printing please go here.

For original pieces, payment plans/layaway is available.

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Brief Yet Everlasting

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(Click image to enlarge)
25 x 25  inches
Pen and ink, watercolor, and colored pencil, acrylic, embossing medium, on Illustration Board

Purchase options:

6 x 6 in. Digital “Mini Print”: $20
8 x 8 in. Digital print (100 in a series):  $50
12 x 12 in. Giclee Print (50 in a series):  $250
25 x 25 in. Giclee Print (original size, 50 in a series):  $500

Original: SOLD

15% of all sales from this image benefit the MISS Foundation

For more information about the types of printing please go here.

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As an artist I strive to represent motherhood in all it’s forms.  Stillbirth, miscarriage, and infant death are realities that are not talked about in our culture yet are expressions of motherhood, parenthood, in every sense.  This piece was done to honor that brief yet profound experience of love and loss.

A huge thank you to my dear friends Darjee and Josh Sahala who allowed me to use their birth photos of Brona, born still May 18, 2008.  To watch a video of Brona’s birth and death please visit their website here.

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I am writing you because I wanted to say thank you.

Two years ago this year, on December 15th, I lost my first child in labor. He was born silent, wonderful, and beautiful. Our family was totally broken. We had tried very hard to conceive our baby boy, and things turned south during a typical at home labor. As someone who advocates for women to be treated and fight for their rights in a hospital, the experience there was a nightmare.

I later got terribly sick with a bowl obstruction due to a mishap of the c-section I was given at the hospital, and ended up having a second surgery on Christmas of 2013 and stayed the new year in the hospital. We came home empty, alone, and my body in a place I never anticipated it to be.

Someone had bought me a mandala of your art piece of the parents holding their spirit baby. I was so touched that someone acknowledged that babies leave us too soon. It is such a profound piece, and in many ways it reflects the exact look of our family during that time. Our son is always with us, but gone forever too. It’s a strange flux to be in, even two years later.

I didn’t allow my son’s death to confine me into a small space. I participated in the Honest Body Project, and spoke about my loss. When I saw that you shared it on your page I felt so happy and proud that you always acknowledge those loss moms.

And so I wanted to say thank you. Thank you for being there for me in ways that you didn’t even know you were. Thank you for standing for moms like me and helping those who don’t have a voice to talk about their silent babies. Thank you for showing that not all moms are quiet, that we roar our baby’s name, and we are proud of the mom’s they have made us become.

Thank you.

~Geralynn 

“I Will Always Love You”

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(Click image to enlarge)

12×12 inches
Watercolor, colored pencil, on illustration board

Purchase options:

6×6 Digital “Mini Print”: $20

8×8 Digital print (100 in a series):  $50
12×12 Giclee Print (50 in a series):  $150

Original (12×12 inches):  SOLD

20% of ALL proceeds from this image goes to the Safe Motherhood Quilt Project

For more information about the types of printing please go here.

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This piece was done for Ina May Gaskin, creator of the Safe Motherhood Quilt Project, with Laura Gilkey and Birth Matters, VA.

It was done in honor of the women who have lost their lives during or around the time of childbirth, for the women who were dealt unfortunate and unavoidable circumstances, the women who do not have access to good maternity care, and the women who were a part of a maternity system that failed them.

On April 10 Ina May and supporters of the Quilt Project will be marching the quilt up the steps of the National Monument in Washington, DC.  This piece will be printed on the supporter’s t-shirts.

About the Safe Motherhood Quilt Prjoect:

The quilt is made up of individually designed squares; each one devoted to a woman in the U.S. who has died of pregnancy-related causes since 1982. One quilt square is designed and dedicated to each mother’s memory and may mention the date and place of death and the name of the woman. The Safe Motherhood Quilt is the voice for women who can no longer speak for themselves.

To be honored and remembered on The Safe Motherhood Quilt:

  • The woman died as a result of a complication of pregnancy or birth
  • The woman’s death occurred since 1982
  • The woman died within a calendar year after the end of her pregnancy (documented by an obituary, death certificate, relative’s or witness’ account).

Did you know…that the United States ranks behind at least 40 other nations in maternal mortality rates according to the World Health Organization. In 2005, the United States reported 15.1 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births, up from 7.5 per 100,000 in 1982.

Did you know…that black women in the United States have 4 times the risk of dying from childbirth or childbirth related complications. Hispanic women in the United States, similarly, are 1.6 times more likely than non-Hispanic white women to die from pregnancy-related causes.

Did you know…that the Centers for Disease Control estimated in 1998 that the US maternal death rate is actually 1.3 to three times that reported in vital statistics records because of underreporting of such deaths.

Did you know…that reporting of maternal deaths in the United States is done via an honor system. There are no statutes providing for penalties for misreporting or failing to report maternal deaths.

Did you know…that the Centers for Disease Control estimates that more than half of the reported maternal deaths in the United States could have been prevented by early diagnosis and treatment.

For more information see the below video: